Posts Tagged marketing

Color Can Impact Your Business, or Beware of Brown!

I’m a true believer in color psychology.  For instance, the pervasive red inside Pizza Hut makes people hungry but keeps them cycling through – they don’t want to linger at the table.  If you’re still working on your brand logo and designs, take color into consideration.  It may sound hokey, but color has an effect on us as human beings.  How do you want to be perceived by your customers?  Optimistic and cheerful?  Serious and straightforward as an expert with the knowledge to back up your claims?

Check out this beautiful chart on branding and color psychology by Marketo for inspiration.  Favorite quote? “[U]se caution with brown as it reminds most people of dirt.”

True Colors: What Your Brand Colors Say About Your Business by Marketo

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Personal Branding For Business – Brilliant, Not Backwards

Personal branding, the science of establishing a brand identity for individuals, usually related to career/professional development.  The personal brand idea is taken from what companies have been doing since the dawn of capitalism, and an individual uses these principles to find a way to stand out from the crowd, figure out what value he or she adds, presenting a consistent personality online to develop a reputation in this space of too-much-information.

I’ve been reading quite a bit about personal branding lately; as a marketer, it fascinates me.  And I realized that some of the tenets of this practice are employing major principles of marketing that have atrophied in business, principles which need to be reexamined if brands are going to survive.

Me, Inc.The following is a list of 10 reasons individuals, especially job seekers, should be concerned with personal branding.  It comes from personalbrandingblog.com, the brain child of Dan Schawbel, one of the current proponents of the field, and author of Me 2.0.  I took these principles and turned them right back around to business branding, because businesses often seem confused in their Web content and social media strategy, as well as branding as a company-life-long effort. Which technologies to use?  What kind of content?  What does our audience want from us?   The information below is taken directly from Schawbel’s blog. I’ve added my comments in italics.

 1. Generations are colliding online

Facebook started out as a hang out place for college students, but now we’re seeing older generations adopt social networking. Social networking use among internet users ages 50 and older nearly doubled—from 22% in April 2009 to 42% in May 2010. This means that communication between age groups is occurring more and more each day, and your audience is changing rapidly. Entire families are interacting online and 70% of parents friend their kids. You have to be aware of your audience and the content you’re publishing because if they don’t match, it can have a negative effect on your personal brand.

Understand your audience. What are the demographics of the largest portions of your customers?  Don’t exclude older users from technology tools, including social media.  And consider your content and how it relates to them. 

2. Your online reputation can make or break you

Your brand is on the line, wherever your name and face is seen. Clients, managers and other professional stakeholders in your life have access to what you post publicly on the net. You can even lose your job over blog comments or attacks from people that already have a negative view on your reputation. For instance, Madhu Yarlagadda was hired by Skype as the new Chief Development Officer, and after a TechCrunch blog post, people came out of the woodwork to expose Madhu. Skype replaced him after a month of employment….

The brand of your employees matters as much as your company’s brand.  You must consider what your people are publishing, and encourage them to develop their own brands as experts in your industry, especially the execs.  And watch out for negativity.  Have policies in place about commenting or responding on blogs!  Transparency is great for business, so you don’t want to have too many watchdogs, but there ought to be some guidelines for avoiding bad publicity traps.

3. Employers are reviewing your online personal brand …

Almost every website on the planet has a search engine component to it and employers are using them to find more information about you.… Make sure your personal brand is consistent and up-to-date.

Make no mistake, people are Googling your company.  With the dollar tighter than ever, people want to know they’re making the right choice when they spend their money.   Check your Google results, and your online reputation.  Make sure it’s consistent with how you want to be perceived. The challenge is always aligning audience perceptions with your own, and how you wish to be seen.  It’s a give and take, but you can help it along with the right Web content, professional profiles, and SEO.

4. Perception (how we present ourselves) is king

It’s the little things that count, whether you’re in an interview, or interacting with people online. A CareerBuilder survey states that 67% of hiring managers say that failure to make eye contact would make them less likely to hire a job candidate and 38% said lack of smile. People will judge you on small things that make a big difference. By being professional, using good eye contact, shaking someone’s hand, having good posture, and using appropriate images online, you will be more successful when communicating with others.

Your customers will judge you on the small stuff, too.  Make sure you’re portraying your brand in a light that engages with your particular audience.  Know who that is.  If it’s a family friendly atmosphere you want, smile in all your photos, talk about your kids in your blog posts, and provide Web content related to child safety or education.  People need to perceive that you are who you say you are, and the tone in your blog and even the way you answer the phone matters.  Tell your employees to always answer the same way, with a smile – others can hear it. 

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The UVP is Dead? Or, Go 007 to Give Your Brand An Actual Personality

In a fascinating article entitled “Does Your Brand Have a Lame Personality?” on Talent Zoo, Tommy Walker starts out seemingly contradicting some of the basic tenets of branding that I have posted here on Royal Pain.  Shocked and dismayed, I read the article voraciously, trying to discern if there was some new idea in branding that I hadn’t seen coming.  Has the UVP (Unique Value Proposition) been replaced with a multifaceted personality that works with different audiences in different ways?  Maybe.  But by the end of the article, I breathed a sigh of relief, for my foundation had not been rattled.  Emboldened definitely, but not shaken.

I am intrigued by the concept Walker raised of being a “living, breathing” brand, just as a person has many aspects to his or her personality.  He asks, “[D]o all of your friends like you for the same reason?” It is worth pondering how the many faces of Eve can happily coexist in a brand that still manages to define itself.  And finding the answer to this puzzle as well as why those friends do actually like you is where the 007 bit comes in.

But before we get to that: the UVP.  I’m not quite ready to do away with it.  I still think that you should choose a genre and customer personality that best fits you and commit to something, because the worst kind of person is the chameleon who puts on a different show with everyone he meets.

However, if you take Walker’s meaning as a nod to the way we present ourselves a little differently at home than at work, or the way we might love to attend the indie crafts market and show off our tattoos, but we also have a hard-driving business side that feels equally comfortable in a good suit… Read the rest of this entry »

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Heretics and Storytelling: Seth Godin on Starting a Movement

I know, I know…everyone posts about Seth Godin.  I feel almost like one of his “sheepwalkers” even doing it.  But face it, the guy has wonderful soundbites and a vault full of insights.  I’m actually sharing one from 2009, which could seem outdated but isn’t.  It’s a galvanizing speech on leading “tribes” – the communities that spring up on the Web and in the world built around challenging the status quo and connecting people.  It’s 17 minutes, but please watch – it goes quickly. 

Some of the insights:

  • People want to be led to connect to like-minded individuals around something that matters.
  • You’re not changing anything if you’re not upsetting someone – be a heretic.
  • It only takes about 1000 people to start a widespread movement – people will spread your message for you if it tells a good story.

 

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How to Be a Singular Brand

In a stellar article on branding from Talent Zoo, Andrew Davis writes about what he believes are the two key points in branding: Singularity and consistency.  As the article discusses the importance of simplicity, I love that he pares branding down to these two words.  He writes, “Singularity means that you keep your brand narrowly focused and constructed around one central idea or theme. Consistency means that you keep this focus unchanged.”  This premise makes total sense, and is one that is often ignored or not understood by many companies. 

If you’re trying to make a name for yourself as an entrepreneur or small business, or you’re a big brand trying to capture more of the market, the game is the same: KISS – Keep It Simple, Sweetheart. (We southerners prefer the nicer version.)  Customers need to be able to associate you with something specific – that’s what a brand is. You should be able to tell your story in seconds, if necessary.

 “Keeping the brand narrowly focused ensures simplicity,” according to Davis. “And, simplicity means you can begin to ‘own’ a term in the mind of consumers. It’s this term that consumers use to define your brand.”  This term is also what you would buy up in Google Adwords. It not only gives your customers something to grab onto when you have a long-term focus, but it helps you design a marketing plan and narrow your target audience. 

And keeping “the focus unchanged” does not mean you can’t expand your offering or grow your market or take on new ventures.  It means you need to know what you stand for and help customers stay loyal to you by continuing to stand for it. There’s enough whiplash change out there for all of us to wallow in. Offer a safe haven (or a fun one, or a seriously twisted one…) for your customers, and be truly singular in a market filled with underachievers.

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Creativity – Not Just For Marketing Budgets

Creativity is the crux of business marketing and operations right now.  People have been forced to get creative in all sorts of ways with the economic crunch, from free advertising to DIY projects.  But this effort shouldn’t end with ways to save money.  With so much competition for business, the ones who win the pot, so to speak, will be the businesses and entrepreneurs that stand out in creative ways. 

This means brainstorming new methods for capturing attention, from starting a blog with personality to inventive contests and promotions.  This means putting your brand “out there” a little more through public speaking engagements with the Chamber of Commerce or hosting events on subjects of importance to you.  It means starting a social media campaign if you don’t already have one, because if you’re not listening to the buzz and getting your name out, someone else who is may soon be taking your customers. 

To stand out in a crowd like this one, you have to be willing to risk putting your authentic self or business brand – what you and your company really stand for – at the forefront of the whirlwind of activity in the marketplace.  Because there is just too much noise right now to go about it any other way, and it will probably only get more crowded.  But being part of your community and getting in front of people both physically and virtually will gain you loyalty and trust, the biggest prize of all.  So sit down with your team (or yourself) and start brainstorming some creative ideas for getting your name in metaphorical lights – or actual ones if that’s what it takes!

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Marketing isn’t evil – anymore…

I know there are many folks out there who still think marketing has an aura of evil about it.  I used to be one of those folks, so I get it.  But the days of making a deal with the devil to market your business are over.  The Internet has made it possible to connect with people and still just be little ole you, without costumes, disguises, sleazy sales tactics, or – of course – selling your soul.

The genius of new media marketing is that you don’t have to be everything to everyone.  Customers can sniff out the inauthentic in any business, so you pretty much have to be yourself – which is good, because who else would you be?

If you’re an entrepreneur or a small business owner, you can talk to, and more importantly, listen to, your customers online and provide them with education and resources to show you care and earn their trust.  You do this through email and e-newsletters, blogs… Read the rest of this entry »

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